pteg welcomes Government decision to keep consulting PTEs on national infrastructure projects

Friday, March 15, 2013
Close up of city centre map

Step in the right direction on linking land use and transport planning

pteg today welcomed the Government’s decision to abandon its proposal to remove Integrated Transport Authorities (ITAs) and Passenger Transport Executives (PTEs), (the strategic transport bodies for the main city regions in the North of England and West Midlands), as statutory consultees for Nationally Significant Infrastructure Projects (NSIP). 

Jonathan Bray, Director of the pteg Support Unit, which works on behalf of the six ITAs and PTEs, said:

“We’re pleased that the Government has listened to our arguments around the importance of ensuring that the local transport implications of major national infrastructure projects are recognised, and that the views of the strategic transport bodies for the city regions are sought. In our response to the consultation, we argued that making the link across land use and transport planning is key to achieving more sustainable development, in line with the government’s wider aspiration in the National Planning Policy Framework. As the bodies responsible for developing Local Transport Plans we believe that we can play a valuable role in this process.”

In its response to the consultation on a ‘one-stop shop’ approach to NSIP applications (published on 12 March 2013), the government recognised the concerns raised about removing ITAs and PTEs from the statutory consultee list and withdrew its proposal to remove them.

ENDS

For more contact Jonathan Bray on 0113 251 7445 / 0781 804 1485
 

Related Documents

Thriving Cities - Integrated land use and transport planning

July, 2011

Setting out the stark choices ahead in new planning reforms, this report recommends three 'golden rules' for future planning policy. The report also highlights good and bad practice on transport and land use planning and calls for local authorities and Local Economic Partnerships to proactively draw up highly sustainable masterplans for development sites of key significance. More widely it argues that planning processes should universally include the bodies responsible for local transport.