Resources

The Resource Centre holds all our documents (briefings, consultation responses, press releases and reports). Signed-in members also have access to projects. You can search the Resource Centre by topic or by type of document. 

Resources

The Local Transport Lottery - The costs and inefficiencies of funding local transport through ad hoc competitions

February, 2020

This report takes an in-depth look at the implications of an excessive reliance on competition funding for urban transport projects.

The research shows how such a reliance impacts local authorities’ ability to deliver value for money and places pressure on authorities and their staff. 

The report is based on surveys and one-to-one interviews with senior officers responsible for delivering transport policies, programmes and projects in some of England’s largest city regions.

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Climate emergency declarations - briefing note

December, 2019
This document provides a summary of which authorities have declared a climate emergency and what targets they are committing to. It does not cover all authorities but focuses primarily in those in the city regions, with some additional key urban areas included for interest. This document represents a snapshot in December 2019, as authorities are continuing to declare climate emergencies and set targets.
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How bus users spend their journey time

November, 2019

This research - conducted by transport consultancy SYSTRA on behalf of the Urban Transport Group - uncovers valuable insights into how passengers spend their time while travelling by bus, and sets out the implications for future bus design and promotion.

The research was based on surveys of over 1,100 people on two different bus routes in Leeds and Nottingham. The two routes both provide a high frequency service and operate with double decker buses with leather seats, WiFi and USB ports - some of the best on-board facilities available. However, the profile of passengers between the two routes was somewhat different, with passengers in Leeds tending to be older, working or retired, whilst a higher proportion of respondents in Nottingham were students, due to the bus route travelling along the university corridor.

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Making the connections on climate: How city regions can join the dots between transport, energy and the built environment

November, 2019

This report draws together practical examples of the links that can be made on climate at the city region level between transport and energy, and between transport and the decarbonisation and adaptation of the built environment.

In doing so, the report also suggests practical interventions that can be made on a host of different types of projects as well as profiling how a city can make these connections in an increasingly systematic way - using Nottingham and Munich as case studies.

You can listen to a podcast of a public lecture held at LSE Cities in London, where the report was launched.

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What scope for boosting bus use? An analysis of the Intrinsic Bus Potential of local authority areas in England

October, 2019

This research, by Transport for Quality of Lifeidentifies the underlying conditions that best predict levels of bus use in local areas. It points to six conditions which, when combined, are used to define the ‘Intrinsic Bus Potential’ (IBP) of a local authority area. These include the Index of Multiple Deprivation, the proportion of students, and rush-hour traffic travel times. 

The report also identifies additional factors which may explain why some areas exceed expectations with higher levels of bus use than predicted, such as a pre-existing culture of bus use, high levels of bus provision, and local factors such as poor rail connectivity.

The research has a number of important implications, including the need for radical change on bus policy to enable more areas to do significantly better on bus patronage. 

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National Initiatives on Skills and Diversity for the Transport Sector

October, 2019
This resource brings together national initiatives on skills and diversity with relevance to the transport sector. This is the only such resource for the transport sector. It can help organisations looking to diversify their workforce, help to raise the profile of careers in transport to the next generation and support inclusion and wellbeing in the current transport workforce.

What next for urban transport?

September, 2019

This report - published to coincide with the 2019 Autumn Party Conferences - identifies four urban transport challenges and four solutions needed to overcome them.

It also details what transport authorities need from Government to bring about these changes. 

On launching the report, Stephen Edwards, Chair of the Urban Transport Group and Executive Director of South Yorkshire Passenger Transport Executive, said: "There is much more that needs to be done if transport is to contribute effectively to meeting the many challenges that city regions face, from the climate crisis to public health challenges associated with a lack of physical activity. The right policies can help overcome these challenges."

MaaS movement? Issues and options on Mobility as a Service for city region transport authorities

September, 2019

This report examines the concept of Mobility as a Service (MaaS) - schemes which provide access to information on, and payment for, transport options via a single digital platform. 

It identifies the three key factors that will determine the future of MaaS and also sets out the issues and options for city regions on the role they might play in shaping MaaS in their areas.

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Doing more for less - How working together on transport cuts costs and saves time

October, 2018
The Urban Transport Group brings together and promotes the interests of Britain’s largest urban areas on transport. Through working together as a network, we help to save time and money for our members by doing things once and collaboratively – rather than separately and expensively. Saving significant costs for our members is just one benefit of being part of our organisation.
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How the transport sector works: a guide for health professionals

August, 2018
An introductory guide to the transport sector for health professionals seeking to collaborate with transport colleagues within local authorities and Combined Authorities. The guide is intended to provide a starting point for joint working. Note that a companion guide 'How the health sector works: a guide for transport professionals' has also been produced.

Transport authorities and universities – how can we work more closely together?

August, 2018
Fostering greater collaboration between transport authorities and academic institutions could deliver benefits for both parties. This briefing note outlines some of the ways in which transport authorities and universities are already collaborating. It is hoped that by presenting different models for collaboration, and the successes that these have delivered, further partnerships can be fostered.

Bus Policy

March, 2018
This updated briefing looks at why buses matter and how bus policy works. It explains the significant challenges facing the sector and how city regions are backing the bus. It also sets out how the 2017 Bus Services Act could help make bus services better.
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What's driving bus patronage change? An analysis of the evidence base

January, 2019

This report explores a range of factors relevant to bus patronage decline, under the themes of social and economic change; alternatives to the bus; and public attitudes to bus travel.

It finds that changing travel habits as a result of different lifestyles and working patterns, wider demographic and economic shifts, the rise of on-demand services, exemplified by runaway growth in Private Hire Vehicles, are amongst the many background factors affecting patronage.

The report also looks at areas where bus use is high or is growing and seeks to draw some initial conclusions about common denominators.

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The place to be: How transit oriented development can support good growth in the city regions

January, 2019

This report examines ‘transit oriented development’ - the principle of putting public transport front and centre in new residential and commercial developments, with the aim of maximising access by public transport, encouraging walking and cycling, and minimising the need to own and use private cars.

The report suggests that transit oriented development has the potential to meet housing need without undermining the green belt or creating more traffic congestion and sprawl. It also examines other areas where it can deliver wide-ranging benefits, such as to local economies; air quality and carbon emissions; social inclusion, employment and skills; health; and public transport patronage.

The place to be sets out a five point plan on how to realise more building developments which are based around sustainable, public transport and active travel.

About towns: How transport can help towns thrive

November, 2018

This report examines the key role that transport interventions can play in supporting post-industrial towns.

It features case studies from the UK and the wider world of how different types of interventions - from transport’s role as an ‘anchor institution’ for local economies and as an employer, through to how transport interchanges can act as ‘gateways’ and sources of civic pride and renewal -  can achieve results.

A key finding of the report is that isolated capital interventions in transport infrastructure are insufficient in themselves. Instead, more co-ordinated programmes of transport capital and revenue investment and support are needed if towns are to truly thrive. 

Policy futures for urban transport

September, 2018

The latest edition of Policy futures for urban transport emphasises how a new deal on funding and powers is essential to keep the UK's cities moving forward.

The report sets out the 10 key policy changes that are needed to make cities healthier, fairer and more prosperous.

These include further devolution of rail services; greater funding for buses; reform of taxi and Private Hire Vehicle legislation; an ambitious strategy to encourage more cycling and walking; a long term investment plan for urban rail services; and a visionary national policy framework on air quality.

Active Travel: Solutions for changing cities

June, 2018

Over the last decade promoting active travel has moved from the fringes of urban transport policy to a much more central role in the planning of cities and their transport networks. This is because the promotion of active travel, and the creation of places and streetscapes where people want to walk and cycle, is such a good fit with where cities that are going places want to be.

In this report we take a detailed look at how active travel schemes can transform cities for the better – from Bristol to Inverness and from post-industrial Northern cities to the heart of the City of London.

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Rail Cities UK: Our vision for their future

June, 2018

Significant rail expansion is the 'only viable option' to help UK cities achieve their ambitions on economic growth and meeting housing demand, whilst also creating attractive urban centres with less road traffic and better air quality.

This report sets out a vision of what a step change in rail provision could mean for passengers and cities - and the obstacles that stand in the way.

White van cities: Questions, challenges and options on the growth of urban van traffic

April, 2018

Our report, White van cities: Questions, challenges and options on the growth of urban van traffic, shows how van traffic is the fastest growing sector of road traffic with growth forecast to continue.

However, the evidence on what is driving growth in van traffic is limited and under researched.

This report explores the scale and nature of the growth in van traffic and the impacts on city regions across a range of policy areas, each of which play a key role in determining whether our cities are the kinds of places that people want to live, work, invest and spend time in.

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Number crunch: Transport trends in the city regions

April, 2018

Our report, Number crunch: Transport trends in the city regions, identifies some of the most defining patterns of the past decade (and projected future trends) that are changing the face of the UK’s city regions, and the way that people travel within them.

Ageing urban populations, rapid bus passenger decline and huge growth in private hire vehicles are just some of the dramatic shifts taking place in UK cities.

The report draws on data from our unique, free and interactive online tool ‘Data Hub’, which allows users to generate bespoke analysis, graphics and charts of transport, economic and population data.

Banks, bytes and bikes: The transport priorities of the new economy

February, 2018

Our report, Banks, bytes and bikes: The transport priorities of the new economy, highlights how transport needs in urban areas are changing amid the growth of the so-called “flat white economy”.

It sets out how this new economy is already a major driver of the wider UK economy, and how business sectors such as communications, media and information increasingly favour urban locations with good quality of place, as well as good access on foot, by bike and by public transport.

The report challenges monolithic views of what business wants on transport in favour of a more nuanced perspective which recognises that there is a new economy with new perspectives on transport priorities.

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Urban Transport Review 2017

December, 2017

"A lot has changed in urban transport over the past year," writes Lilian Greenwood MP, and Chair of the Transport Select Committee, in the foreword to the Urban Transport Review 2017.

In collaboration with Passenger Transport magazine, this Review features an in depth interview with our Chair Tobyn Hughes, our Director Jonathan Bray shares his key issues for 2018, and we profile some of the most significant changes to transport during 2017. 

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Local roads funding and governance

October, 2018
Our response to the Transport Committee Inquiry into the condition of local roads, their funding and governance. We suggest four actions for government to enable local roads to be bought up to the required standard and be future-ready.
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Transport Select Committee
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